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Home » FOR UPSC IMPORTANT CURRENTAFFAIRS NOTES 17 DEC 18

FOR UPSC IMPORTANT CURRENTAFFAIRS NOTES 17 DEC 18

Note:  The following Current affairs has been selected from AIR, PIB, PRS, BBC, The Hindu, IDSA (Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses), Live mint, Indian Express, Quora.com, Hindustan Times, Telegraph, The Times , WTO, New Indian express , The Guardian and is highly recommended for UPSC Prelims and Mains Examination

 

News Analysis: 17-12-2018

National News

 

General Studies-II : Issues relating to development and management of Social Sector/Services relating to Health, Education, Human Resources.

 

Union Home Minister meets J&K school children under Youth Exchange Programme ‘Watan ko Jano’

  • The Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has been organising programme “Watan ko Jano” to give exposure to the youth and children of J&K about the cultural and socioeconomic development taking place in other parts of the country.

  • Youth and children hit by militancy and from weaker sections of the society have been identified for the purpose.

  • Organized by the Department of J&K Affairs, MHA in association with J&K State Rehabilitation Council, Social Welfare Department, the group of 244 students from Classes 1 to 12, including 46 girls, representing all 22 districts of the state, and escorted by 23 teachers, are on a 10-day visit to Delhi and Lucknow.

 

Source: The Hindu

 

General Studies-III : Awareness in the fields of IT, Space, Computers, robotics, nano-technology, bio-technology and issues relating to intellectual property rights.

 

ISRO’s GSAT-7A to add muscle to Air Force

  • Military communication satellite GSAT-7A, due to be launched on December 19 evening from Sriharikota, is expected to add a new space-based dimension to the way Indian Air Force interlinks, operates and communicates with its aircraft.

  • Although all Indian communication satellites offer capacity to the armed forces, GSAT-7A will be the first one built primarily for the IAF to qualitatively unify its assets and improve combined, common intelligence during operations.

  • With integrated action being a buzzword it will also support aerial activities of the Army and the Navy where required.

  • The ground force’s Army Aviation Corps operates many helicopters, uses UAVs and will acquire fixed wing aircraft in future — all for surveillance and rescue missions.

  • Multiple sources said the satellite using Ku band will enable superior real time aircraft-to-aircraft communication; and between planes that are in flight and their commanders on the ground.

  • It would enhance by many times the coverage now provided by ground communication systems such as radars and stations of the Army.

  • Out-of-sight and remote areas where ground infrastructure and signals are difficult would get into the critical information loop.

  • In 2018, ISRO launched GSAT-11 on December 5 on a European vehicle from Kourou, GSAT-29 on November 14 on its GSLV-MkIII vehicle from Sriharikota, and the ill-fated GSAT-6A on March 29 from Sriharikota.

Source: The Hindu


 

 General Studies-III : Challenges to internal security through communication networks, role of media and social networking sites in internal security challenges, basics of cyber security; money-laundering and its prevention Security challenges and their management in border areas; linkages of organized crime with terrorism Various Security forces and agencies and their mandate.

 

Navy to helm centre on maritime security

  • The Navy will formally inaugurate the Information Fusion Centre (IFC) for the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) later this week.

  • Through this Centre, information on “white shipping”, or commercial shipping, will be exchanged with countries in the region to improve maritime domain awareness in the Indian Ocean

  • The IFC has been established at the Navy’s Information Management and Analysis Centre (IMAC) in Gurugram, which is the single point centre linking all the coastal radar chains to generate a seamless real-time picture of the nearly 7,500-km coastline

  • Against this backdrop, information exchange at the Centre would be initially undertaken by virtual means, telephone calls, faxes, e-mails and video conferencing.

  • Subsequently, to enable better interconnection, quicker analysis of information and timely inputs, the IFC-IOR would host liaison officers from foreign countries.

  • Establishment of the IFR-IRO would ensure that the entire region is benefited by mutual collaboration and exchange of information and understanding the concerns and threats which are prevalent in the region.

  • The information is available primarily through the Automatic Identification System (AIS) fitted on merchant ships with more than 300 gross registered tonnage as mandated by the International Maritime Organisation.

  • The AIS information comprises name, MMSI number, position, course, speed, last port visited, destination and so on. This information can be picked up through various AIS sensors including coastal AIS chains and satellite based receivers.

  • Such multilateral agreements are necessitated due to the large traffic in the Indian Ocean which cannot be entirely monitored by any one nation.

 

Source: The Hindu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Studies-III : Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment Disaster and disaster management.

 

Climate talks deliver ‘rule book’

  • Nations on Sunday struck a deal to breathe life into the landmark 2015 Paris climate treaty after marathon UN talks that failed to match the ambition the most vulnerable countries need to avert dangerous global warming.

  • Delegates from nearly 200 states finalised a common rule book designed to deliver on the Paris goals of limiting global temperature rises to well below 2°Celsius.

  • But states already dealing with devastating floods, droughts and extreme weather made worse by climate change said the package agreed in the mining city of Katowice lacked the bold ambition to cut emissions the world needed.

  • Egyptian Ambassador Wael Aboulmagd, chair of the developing nations G77 plus China negotiating bloc, said the rule book saw the “urgent adaptation needs of developing countries relegated to a second-class status”.

  • The final decision text was repeatedly delayed as negotiators sought guidelines that could ward off the worst threats posed by the heating planet while protecting the economies of rich and poor nations alike.

  • At their heart, negotiations were about how each nation funds action to mitigate and adapt to climate change, as well as how those actions are reported.

  • French President Emmanuel Macron, who has recently backed down on anti-pollution fuel tax hikes in the face of countrywide protests, said France must “show the way” as he welcomed the progress made at the talks.

  • Developing nations had wanted more clarity from richer ones over how the future climate fight will be funded and pushed for so-called “loss and damage” measures. This would see richer countries giving money now to help deal with the effects of climate change many vulnerable states are already experiencing.

  • Another contentious issue was the integrity of carbon markets, looking ahead to the day when the patchwork of distinct exchanges — in China, the Europe Union, parts of the U.S. — may be joined up in a global system.

  • The Paris Agreement calls for setting up a mechanism to guard against practices such as double counting emissions savings, which could undermine such a market. Delegates eventually agreed on Saturday to kick the issue down the road until next year.

  • One of the largest disappointments for countries of all wealths and sizes was the lack of ambition to reduce emissions shown in the final COP24 text.

  • Most nations wanted the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to form a key part of future planning. It had highlighted the need to slash carbon pollution by nearly half before 2030 in order to hit the 1.5°C target. But the U.S., Saudi Arabia, Russia and Kuwait objected, leading to watered-down wording.

  • The final statement from the Polish COP24 presidency welcomed “the timely conclusion” of the report and invited “parties to make use of it” — hardly the ringing endorsement many nations had called for.

Source: The Hindu




 

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