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Home » THE HINDU, PIB CURRENT NEWS ANALYSIS 23 FEB 2018

THE HINDU, PIB CURRENT NEWS ANALYSIS 23 FEB 2018

Note:  The following Current affairs has been selected from AIR, PIB, PRS, BBC, The Hindu, IDSA (Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses), Live mint, Indian Express, Quora.com, Hindustan Times, Telegraph, The Times , WTO, New Indian express , The Guardian and is highly recommended for UPSC Prelims and Mains Examination

 

News Analysis: 23-02-2018

 

National News

 

General Studies-II : Structure, organization and functioning of the Executive and the Judiciary

Cannot annul marriage between adults: SC

Details:

  • Courts cannot annul marriages between two consenting adults or resort to a “roving enquiry” on whether the married relationship between a man and a woman is based on consent, the Supreme Court said on Thursday.
  • A Bench, led by Chief Justice Dipak Misra, defined the limits of the court’s jurisdiction in the Hadiya case.
  • Ms. Hadiya, a 26-year-old homoeopathy student, had converted to Islam and then married a Muslim.
  • The Kerala High Court had annulled Ms. Hadiya’s marriage to Shafin Jahan.
  • Her father, Asokan K.M., alleged that she had been indoctrinated by a “well-oiled network,” involved in recruiting Indian citizens and trafficking them abroad.

 

Source-The Hindu

General Studies-II : Issues relating to development and management of Social Sector/Services relating to Health, Education, Human Resources.

 

Saving lives

Image result for neonatal mortality in india

  • A new country-wise ranking of neonatal mortality rates — the number of babies dying in their first month for every thousand live births — gives India cause for both hope and shame.
  • Shame, because the report, produced by the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef), ranks India behind poorer countries such as Bangladesh, Nepal and Rwanda.
  • Hope, because the ranking shows that financial resources are not the biggest constraint in improving this health indicator; political will is.
  • According to the report, titled “Every Child Alive”, while average newborn mortality in low-income nations is nine times that of high-income ones, several countries buck the trend, showing a way forward for India.
  • For example, Sri Lanka and Ukraine, which like India are categorised as lower-middle income economies, had a neonatal mortality of around 5/1000 in 2016.
  • In comparison, the U.S., a high-income economy, did only slightly better with a rate of 3.7/1000.
  • Meanwhile, Rwanda, which falls in the lowest income group of less than $1,005 per capita, has brought down its mortality rates from 41/1000 in the 1990s to 16.5 through programmes targeted at poor and vulnerable mothers. Money matters, but intent matters more.
  • India saw the 31st highest newborn-mortality rate, at 25.4 deaths per 1000 in 2016, while Pakistan had the highest.
  • Coming in after 30 countries is no comfort, however, because a small mortality rate can translate to numerous deaths when the birth-rate is high.
  • This means India lost 640,000 babies in 2016, more than any other country. How can we chip away at this staggering number?
  • The report points out that the most powerful solutions are not necessarily the most expensive.
  • The 10 critical products that hospitals must stock to save newborns include a piece of cloth to keep a baby warm and close to the mother to encourage breastfeeding.
  • The list also includes antibiotics and disinfectants, the use of which can stave off killers like sepsis and meningitis.
  • The biggest cause of death is premature birth, while the second is complications like asphyxia during delivery.
  • Preventing these would mean paying attention to the mother’s health during pregnancy and ensuring she delivers in a hospital attended by trained doctors or midwives.
  • India has programmes such as the Janani Suraksha Yojana for this, but must expand its reach in laggard States like Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.
  • Then there are factors outside the healthcare system, like female literacy rates, that make a big difference to healthcare-seeking behaviour.
  • But changes in education levels will come slowly.
  • Despite these challenges, progress is within reach. States like Kerala and Tamil Nadu show that by focussing on these factors, newborn deaths can be brought to fewer than 15 per 1000 in Indian settings. It’s time for the rest of India to follow suit.

 

Source-The Hindu, Indian Journal on Public Health

General Studies-II : Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

 

DoT’s plan to spur synergy among 7 PSUs

Details:

  • The government on Thursday unveiled a ‘strategic plan’ to enable seven state-owned companies under the Department of Telecom (DoT) to work closely with an aim of promoting greater operational synergy among them, including pooling in of resources and effective utilisation of human resources as well as land and buildings.
  • The action plan covers MTNL, BSNL, Indian Telephone Industries (ITI), Centre for Development of Telematics (CDOT), Telecommunications Consultants India Ltd. (TCIL), Testing and Certification of Telecom Equipments (TEC) and BharatNet (BBNL)
  • The strategic plan, finalised after several discussions between all stakeholders, entails effective utilisation of human resources, optimum use of vacant space and promoting ‘Make in India’, among other things.
  • Under the plan, the Centre intended to train and redeploy manpower
  • The strategic roadmap will also cover other areas such as standards and certification, and preparing to tap opportunities in areas like 5G and Internet of Things.

 

Source-The Hindu

International News:

 

General Studies-II : Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements involving India and/or affecting India's interests Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India's interests

Pakistani action on terrorists superficial: U.S.

Details:

  • The Donald Trump administration is not satisfied with the measures taken by Pakistan in recent months to crack down on terrorist groups, a senior U.S. official has said.
  • “So far, these steps have been reversible, superficial, and steps that we have actually seen them take in the past, in periods of high pressure,”
  • The official said the U.S. was concerned about tensions between India and Pakistan, “two nuclear armed states”, but added the onus was on Pakistan to create conditions conducive for talks and improvement in relations.
  • The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) plenary in Paris was yet to take a decision on action against Islamabad on the question of terrorism financing.

Source-The Hindu

General Studies-II : Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements involving India and/or affecting India's interests Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India's interests

India, Canada hold strategic dialogue

Details:

  • Ahead of Friday’s India-Canada bilateral summit, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland held a strategic dialogue here on Thursday covering a wide range of bilateral issues.
  • Two leaders “had wide-ranging discussions on strengthening relations in trade and investment, security and cyber security, energy, people-to-people contacts and other relevant bilateral and regional issues.”
  • Ties between New Delhi and Ottawa have been frosty in recent times as Canada is being seen as offering a platform to separatists demanding an independent Khalistan.

 

Source-The Hindu

 

Canada, India red-faced over invite to Khalistan activist

Details:

  • Visiting Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office and the Modi government faced a major embarrassment on Thursday after it emerged that a convicted terrorist and Khalistan activist from Canada had been part of the delegation’s events in Mumbai and was personally invited to a reception by the Canadian High Commission in Delhi.
  • The Canadian High Commission said it had “rescinded” the invitation to Jaspal Atwal, an Indian-origin businessman, and former member of the banned International Sikh Youth Federation (ISYF), thought to be responsible, along with the Babbar Khalsa, for the 1985 mid-air bombing of Air India flight 182, killing 329 persons.
  • Mr. Atwal was one of four men convicted for shooting Punjab Minister Malkiat Singh Sidhu in 1986 during a private visit to Canada.

 

Source-The Hindu

Other Issues in News:

PNB scam: luxe cars, assets worth ₹100 cr. seized

The Enforcement Directorate (ED) on Thursday seized property worth around ₹100 crore belonging to Nirav Modi and Mehul Choksi in connection with the alleged Letter of Undertaking fraud unearthed in the Punjab National Bank earlier this month.

 

CBI arrests Rotomac director Vikram Kothari, son

The CBI on Thursday arrested Rotomac Global Private Limited promoter-director Vikram Kothari and his son in the alleged ₹3,695-crore “wilful” loan default case. They have been accused of cheating a consortium of seven nationalised banks.

 

Source-The Hindu

 

 

 

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